color wheel spin

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If you look at the basic color circle you will notice that he is distinct on 12 pieces (colors): primary, secondary and tertiary colors and their differences in brightness.

color wheel

color wheel

With Red on the top circle of color is made of three primary colors: Red, Yellow and Blue. Those three colors close triangle inside a circle of colors. Three secondary colors are: Orange, Purple and Green. They turned from mixing primary colors and in a circle of color they are in between them completing another triangle. Tertiary colors that are result of mixing primary and secondary colors are: Red orange, Yellow orange, Yellow green, Blue green, Blue purple and Red purple.

Complementary colors-if you look the circle of color, the color that is diagonally opposite of one color is compliment of that color. Complementary pairs are: Red-Green, Blue-Orange, and Yellow-Purple. Complementary colors clash each other due to the fact that none contains no small part of the other-so when they are together in a single place both strongly emphasizes.

Reference:

Offset printing inks

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Offset printing inks

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Offset inks also known as lithographic inks are compounded primarily for use on machines for offset sheetfed printing. Defining the term offset ink – it simply pertains to a very simple principle where the ink and water don’t mix. The images and words are placed on plates, dampened first by water then followed by the ink.

Offset printing inks

Offset printing inks

The ink then adheres to the image area, water to the non-image area. That’s why the offset inks must be capable to withstand reaction with the press fountain solution it encounters on the dampened offset plate. Ideally, the ink on the ink roller must not absorb water (water-in-ink emulsification), neither should the ink break down and mix with the fountain solution on the non-printing areas of the plate (ink-in-water emulsification). Either of these emulsification problems will have a tendency to impair the body, color, or drying qualities of the ink, or trigger tinting on the non-printing regions the plate and printed sheets. The press works the ink, thereby heating it and reducing its viscosity or body, making it flow readily to provide a uniform ink film to the images area of the plate. The ink being used on an offset press needs to be competent to carry the full-intended color and covering power to the paper even with the split-film action. This happens for the reason that offset blanket picks up only a small percentage of the ink from the plate and delivers only a portion of that to the paper. The film of ink getting the plate, then, is very thin, and the ink must be competent to show its full color and opacity with this film.

Offset inks

Offset inks

Offset Ink is produced from three major substances: Pigment, the coloring material in the ink; Vehicle, the liquid that holds the particles of pigment; and Modifiers, which actually control the drying of the ink as well as additional factors such as smell, scuff resistance, and fading.

PIGMENT: There are two basic kinds of pigment used in printing inks. Organic pigment, which happens to be produced from carbon, is used for making black ink. Inorganic pigments, which are produced by mixing various chemicals together, are used for colored inks.

VEHICLE: Vehicle is the liquid that holds the particles of pigment and carries them to the paper. There are two kinds of vehicles applied in offset inks: oils such as soy oil or linseed oil (that’s a yellowish oil made from flax); and synthetic vehicles, that happen to be liquids resulting from the mixture of chemicals. Vehicles control the film properties of the dried ink, such as gloss and rub resistance. They have high viscosity, so the inks are referred to as paste inks.

MODIFIERS: Modifiers are ingredients added to the ink to control drying and other properties such as smell and resistance to fading.

Reference:

Offset printing inks